More pictures from p&p

While I was with patterns & practices, Microsoft invested a considerable sum of money to build the team a custom space that that lent itself to agile software development. My friend Darrell Snow was largely responsible for securing the project and shepherding it through the 40 some odd cooks who want to put their fingers in the stew. Overall, it turned out amazingly well - though the team spaces could be a bit bigger, IMHO. Even so, I really miss working in that space.

Most of the photographs below were all taken shortly after the team moved into the space. For context, the first picture shows what our team room looked like before the new space and the second picture is a floor plan of the new space.

Nostalgia

While trying to figure out how to SEO this new site, today, I ran across a few pictures from my time at Microsoft. It brought back some fond memories. One thing I've got to say for that company that you don't often hear is that their facilities are amazing - especially the p&p offices and the conference center where these shots were taken.

Coding Standards

One of the original practices of Extreme Programming was coding standards. Back in 2000, when I read my first XP book, I tensed up a bit at the thought of having to make my code look like everyone else’s. But, over the years, I’ve come to see the wisdom of it: once all the code follows the same standard, it becomes much easier to read.

In fact, now a days, I often reformat a block of code to meet a coding standard before I try to figure out what it’s doing. (But, only when I have strong unit tests!) Long story short, I haven’t had a good knock-down-drag-out argument about curly braces in nearly ten years! (Anyone want to have one for old time’s sake?)

With that in mind, I needed to look up Microsoft’s latest guidelines for .NET class libraries, today. Specifically, I knew they said something about using abbreviations and acronyms when naming things. But, I couldn’t remember exactly what the recommendation was. So, I looked it up. Turns out, Microsoft has done a rather nice job of structuring their design guidance on the web.

It’s not something you’ll need to refer to everyday. But, it’s good to know it’s out there…

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/czefa0ke(v=VS.71).aspx